Inactivation of classical swine fever virus in porcine casing preserved in salt

Wijnker, J.J.; Depner, Klaus Robert GND; Berends, B.R.

Pig intestines used for the production of natural sausage casings may carry classical swine fever (CSF) virus. Feeding pigs with human food waste that contains pig casings may then spread the virus to CSF-free animals. Casings derived from a pig experimentally infected with CSF by dosing with 106 tissue Culture infectious doses (TCID50) of the highly virulent CSF virus strain "Koslov", were treated with phosphate supplemented or citrate supplemented NaCl, instead of with NaCl alone, which is the standard preservation treatment for casings. Treated casings were stored for 30 days at either 4 degrees C or 20 degrees C. After storage the casings were fed to 16 susceptible pigs. CSF infection was confirmed in the four animals that had been fed casings treated with citrate supplemented salt and stored at 4 degrees C. All other animals remained healthy. It is therefore possible to avoid the inadvertent spread of CSF virus via porcine sausage casings by treating casings with phosphate supplemented salt and storing them for 30 days at temperatures over 4 degrees C. (c) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved,

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Wijnker, J.J. / Depner, Klaus Robert / Berends, B.R.: Inactivation of classical swine fever virus in porcine casing preserved in salt. 2008.

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