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Adding to the mix - Challenges of mixed-fisheries management in the North Sea under climate change and technical interactions

GND
1222458438
ORCID
0000-0003-3847-655X
Affiliation
Thünen Institute of Sea Fisheries, Bremerhaven, Germany
Kühn, Bernhard;
GND
137390092
ORCID
0000-0003-3222-1011
Affiliation
Thünen Institute of Sea Fisheries, Bremerhaven, Germany
Kempf, Alexander;
ORCID
0000-0001-8629-3614
Affiliation
Wageningen Marine Research, IJmuiden, Netherlands
Brunel, Thomas;
Affiliation
Marine Laboratory, Marine Scotland Science, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Cole, Harriet;
Affiliation
Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, Geesthacht, Germany
Mathis, Moritz;
Affiliation
Research Institute for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Ostend, Belgium
Sys, Klaas;
ORCID
0000-0002-3831-1416
Affiliation
National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark
Trijoulet, Vanessa;
Affiliation
Ifremer, EMH, Nantes, France
Vermard, Youen;
GND
135768179
ORCID
0000-0001-9730-6994
Affiliation
Thünen Institute of Sea Fisheries, Bremerhaven, Germany
Taylor, Marc

Technical interactions (multiple fleets fishing multiple species with various gears, as either target or bycatch), bycatch regulations through a landing obligation, and biological and economic effects of climate change, affecting fisheries yield and profits, provide a challenge for demersal mixed fisheries of the North Sea. A multi-stock, multi-fleet, bioeconomic model was used to understand management options under these combined influences. Scenarios considered climate change effects on recruitment of three main gadoid stocks (cod – Gadus morhua, saithe – Pollachius virens, whiting – Merlangius merlangus), possible future developments of fuel and fish prices, and strict implementation of a landing obligation. The latter leads to decreased yield and profits in the short term due to increased choke effects, mainly of North Sea cod, being influenced by climate-induced productivity changes. Allowing fishing above FMSY, but within sustainable limits, or limiting year-to-year quota changes, could help buffer initial losses at the expense of decreased profits in the mid- to long-term. Economic performance of individual fleets was linked to their main target's stock status, cost structure, and fuel and fish prices. The results highlight a need to consider both biological and economic consequences of climate change in the management of mixed fisheries.

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