Article CC BY 4.0
refereed
published

Limits in reaching the anhydrous state of wood and cellulose

GND
1123150826
Affiliation
Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, Aalto, Finland
Altgen, Michael;
GND
172712246
Affiliation
Institute of Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Universität Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, Hamburg, Germany
Fröba, Michael;
GND
1025013735
Affiliation
Institute of Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Universität Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, Hamburg, Germany
Gurr, Julius;
GND
13288318X
ORCID
0000-0003-2304-8843
Affiliation
Institute of Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Universität Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, Hamburg, Germany
Krause, Andreas;
GND
124061451
Affiliation
Thünen Institute of Wood Research, Leuschnerstraße, 91, Hamburg, Germany
Ohlmeyer, Martin;
GND
1025193059
Affiliation
Institute of Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Universität Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, Hamburg, Germany
Sazama, Uta;
ORCID
0000-0001-7627-8840
Affiliation
FirmoLin, Agrobaan 4a, Ysselsteyn, Netherlands
Willems, Wim;
GND
1147642575
ORCID
0000-0002-4751-7459
Affiliation
Institute of Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Universität Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, Hamburg, Germany
Nopens, Martin

Water-sorption studies and certain organic chemistry reactions require water removal from cellulosic samples. This is hindered by the strong interaction of cellulosic materials with water, and it remains uncertain if a completely anhydrous state can be reached under common drying conditions. Here, different drying conditions were applied to wood and cellulose, and the residual moisture contents were quantified either gravimetrically or by coulometric Karl-Fischer titration. Vacuum-drying at 103 °C and ≤ 1 mbar for at least 360 min decreased the moisture content to ≤ 0.04%. However, in automated sorption balances, drying at atmospheric pressure under dry air or nitrogen flow left some samples with more than 1% moisture content. The residual moisture content obtained under dry gas flow was temperature dependent. Increasing the temperature up to 55 °C decreased the residual moisture content and cooling resulted in a moisture re-uptake, presumably due to small quantities of water vapor in the surrounding atmosphere. These effects must be considered in fundamental studies on water interactions of cellulosic materials.

Preview

Cite

Citation style:
Could not load citation form.

Access Statistic

Total:
Downloads:
Abtractviews:
Last 12 Month:
Downloads:
Abtractviews:

Rights

Use and reproduction: