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Effect of pathogen virulence on pathogenicity, host range and reproduction of Plasmodiophora brassicae, the causal agent of clubroot disease

GND
1058931261
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute of Plant Protection in Field Crops and Grassland, Germany
Zamani-Noor, Nazanin;
GND
1206123133
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute of Plant Protection in Field Crops and Grassland, Germany
Brand, Sinja;
GND
12343498X
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute of Plant Protection in Field Crops and Grassland, Germany
Söchting, Hans-Peter

A series of greenhouse experiments was conducted to evaluate the effect of Plasmodiophora brassicae virulence on clubroot development and propagation of resting spores in 86 plant species from 19 botanical families. Plants were artificially inoculated with two isolates of P. brassicae, which were either virulent on clubroot-resistant oilseed rape cv. Mendel (P1 (+)) or avirulent on this cultivar (P1). Clubroot severity and the number of resting spores inside the roots were assessed 35 days post inoculation. Typical clubroot symptoms were observed only in the Brassicaceae family. P1 (+)-inoculated species exhibited more severe symptoms (2 to 10-fold more severe), bigger galls (1.1 to 5.8 fold heavier) and higher number of resting spores than the P1-inoculated plants. Among all Brassica species, Bunias orientalis, Coronopus squamatus and Raphanus sativus were fully resistant against both isolates, while Camelina sativa, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Coincya momensis, Descurainia sophia, Diplotaxis muralis, Erucastrum gallicum, Neslia paniculata, Sinapis alba, S. arvensis, Sisymbrium altissimum, S. loeselii and Thlaspi arvense were highly susceptible. Conringia orientalis, Diplotaxis tenuifolia, Hirschfeldia incana, Iberis amara, Lepidium campestre and Neslia paniculata were completely or partially resistant to P1-isolate but highly susceptible to P1 (+). These results propose that the basis for resistance in these species may be similar to that found in some commercial cultivars, and that these species could contribute to the build-up of inoculum of virulent pathotypes. Furthermore, the pathogen DNA was detected in Alopecurus myosuroides, Phacelia tanacatifolia, Papaver rhoeas and Pisum sativum. It can concluded that the number and diversity of hosts for P. brassicae are greater than previously reported.

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