Article CC BY-NC 4.0
refereed
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What’s in a wine?–A spot check of the integrity of European wine sold in China based on anthocyanin composition, stable isotope and glycerol impurity analysis

ORCID
0000-0001-9774-5209
Affiliation
German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department 8 Safety in the Food Chain, Unit 83 Product Identity, Supply Chains and Traceability, Germany
Müller, Teresa M.;
Affiliation
China National Research Institute of Food and Fermentation Industries Co., Ltd. (CNRIFFI), National Food Fermentation Standardization Center, Beijing, China
Zhong, Qiding;
Affiliation
China National Research Institute of Food and Fermentation Industries Co., Ltd. (CNRIFFI), National Food Fermentation Standardization Center, Beijing, China
Fan, Shuangxi;
Affiliation
China National Research Institute of Food and Fermentation Industries Co., Ltd. (CNRIFFI), National Food Fermentation Standardization Center, Beijing, China
Wang, Daobing;
Affiliation
German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department 8 Safety in the Food Chain, Unit 83 Product Identity, Supply Chains and Traceability, Germany
Fauhl-Hassek, Carsten

The international wine market has been repeatedly hit by cases of fraud in recent decades. While several studies attested a special vulnerability of the fast growing wine business in China, reports on chemical analyses of commercial wine samples are rare. We examined 50 predominantly red wines with European labelling, which were purchased on the Chinese market, for fraud-relevant parameters. More than 20% of the tested samples revealed anomalies in relation to the stable isotope ratios of D/H, ¹⁸O/¹⁶O and ¹³C/¹²C, contents of technical glycerol by-products or anthocyanin composition. These results strongly suggested watering of the wines, chaptalisation, glycerol addition or the use of non-Vitis anthocyanin sources, respectively. Some of these samples also showed suspicious spelling errors or other irregularities in the labelling, but the majority appeared genuine to the eye. Hence, this spot check demonstrates the importance of chemical authenticity analysis of market samples in order to detect fraudulent products. Moreover, we used the same sample set for an evaluation of the Chinese standard method for carbon stable isotope determination of wine ethanol in comparison to the current OIV (International Organisation of Vine and Wine) standard method. The results of a Bland-Altman analysis indicated that the methods can be applied interchangeably. As the two methods differ in their workflow and in the requested equipment, this might eventually enable more laboratories to perform ¹³C/¹²C analysis of wine and spirits.

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