Article CC BY 4.0
refereed
published

Infection of susceptible/tolerant barley genotypes with Barley yellow dwarf virus alters the host plant preference of Rhopalosiphum padi clones depending upon their ability to transmit BYDV

GND
1171452691
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Resistance Research and Stress Tolerance, Germany
Kern, Maria;
GND
1172302715
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Ecological Chemistry, Plant Analysis and Stored Product Protection, Germany
Meiners, Torsten;
GND
1059141795
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Resistance Research and Stress Tolerance, Germany
Schliephake, Edgar;
GND
1059141299
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Resistance Research and Stress Tolerance, Germany
Habekuß, Antje;
GND
172295300
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Resistance Research and Stress Tolerance, Germany
Ordon, Frank;
GND
137978146
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Resistance Research and Stress Tolerance, Germany
Will, Torsten

Discovering mechanisms of plant–virus–vector interactions is fundamental to understand their ecology and evolution and to apply this knowledge in plant protection. To study the influence of varying Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) transmission efficiencies on host plant preference of Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) clones, we performed host choice experiments with two barley cultivars (BYDV susceptible cv. ‘Rubina’ and BYDV tolerant cv. ‘Vixen’) including healthy and virus-infected plants. For the susceptible barley cultivar ‘Rubina’, aphid clone R07 (high transmission efficiency) preferred BYDV-infected over healthy host plants after 24 h, while clones D10 (medium transmission efficiency) and R09 (low transmission efficiency) preferred neither host. In contrast, BYDV infection of ‘Vixen’ did not affect the plant’s appeal for aphid clone R07. Host plant access, indicated by ingestion and observed by electrical penetration graph technique for a period of 2 h, was facilitated on BYDV-infected cv. ‘Rubina’ for the clones R07 and D10, whereas an opposite effect was observed for the clone R09. For R07 and R09, the difference was not visible after a period of 5 h. As observed earlier for BYDV-infected wheat, enhanced emission of volatile organic compounds associated with virus-induced attraction was detected for BYDV-infected cv. ‘Rubina.’ It is concluded that host plant preference is possibly linked with a high BYDV transmission efficiency as observed for the clone R07, leading to a fitness advantage of this clone as indicated by early increased ingestion. This advantage is not present on BYDV-tolerant genotypes most likely due to the absence of infection symptoms.

Preview

Cite

Citation style:
Could not load citation form.

Access Statistic

Total:
Downloads:
Abtractviews:
Last 12 Month:
Downloads:
Abtractviews:

Rights

License Holder: The Author(s) 2021

Use and reproduction:

Export