Article CC BY 4.0
refereed
published

Using structured eradication feasibility assessment to prioritize the management of new and emerging invasive alien species in Europe

Affiliation
Animal and Plant Health Agency, Non-Native Species Secretariat, United Kingdom ; Newcastle University, Modelling, Evidence and Policy Group, United Kingdom
Booy, Olaf;
Affiliation
Newcastle University, Modelling, Evidence and Policy Group, United Kingdom
Robertson, Pete A.;
Affiliation
Animal and Plant Health Agency, Non-Native Species Secretariat, United Kingdom
Moore, Niall;
Affiliation
Newcastle University, Modelling, Evidence and Policy Group, United Kingdom
Ward, Jess;
Affiliation
UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, United Kingdom
Roy, Helen E.;
Affiliation
Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Wildlife Management and Invasive Species, Belgium
Adriaens, Tim;
Affiliation
CABI Science Centre, United Kingdom
Shaw, Richard;
Affiliation
Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, National Reference Centre, Netherlands
Van Valkenburg, Johan;
Affiliation
Natural Resources Wales, Maes y Ffynnon, UK
Wyn, Gabrielle;
Affiliation
University of Turin, Department of Agriculture, Forest and Food Sciences, Italy
Bertolino, Sandro;
Affiliation
Avignon Université, UMR CNRS IRD Aix Marseille Université, Institut Méditerranéen de Biodiversité et d’Ecologie, France
Blight, Olivier;
Affiliation
Invasive Species Unit, Service Public de Wallonie, Belgium
Branquart, Etienne;
Affiliation
University of Sassari, Department of Agriculture, Italy
Brundu, Giuseppe;
Affiliation
INVAS Biosecurity, Stillorgan, Co, Ireland
Caffrey, Joe;
Affiliation
Directorate for Natural Capital, Latium Region, Parks and Protected Areas, Italy
Capizzi, Dario;
Affiliation
Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Wildlife Management and Invasive Species, Belgium
Casaer, Jim;
Affiliation
Ghent University, Biology Department, Research Group Phycology, Belgium
De Clerck, Olivier;
Affiliation
Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Coughlan, Neil E.;
Affiliation
Department of Environmental Science, Centre for Environmental Research, Innovation and Sustainability, Institute of Technology, Ireland
Davis, Eithne;
Affiliation
Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
Dick, Jaimie T. A.;
Affiliation
University Vienna, Division of Conservation Biology, Vegetation Ecology and Landscape Ecology, Austria
Essl, Franz;
Affiliation
Entomology and Invasive Plants Unit, Plant Health Laboratory, France
Fried, Guillaume;
Affiliation
Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (ISPRA), and Chair IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group, Italy
Genovesi, Piero;
Affiliation
CABI Science Centre, United Kingdom ; University of Córdoba, Department of Forest Engineering (ERSAF), Spain
González-Moreno, Pablo;
Affiliation
Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Wildlife Management and Invasive Species, Belgium
Huysentruyt, Frank;
Affiliation
Bangor University, School of Ocean Sciences, United Kingdom
Jenkins, Stuart R.;
Affiliation
Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS), Belgium
Kerckhof, Francis;
Affiliation
Department of Environmental Science, Centre for Environmental Research, Innovation and Sustainability, Institute of Technology, Ireland
Lucy, Frances E.;
Affiliation
University of Bern, Switzerland
Nentwig, Wolfgang;
Affiliation
Environment Agency, United Kingdom
Newman, Jonathan;
Affiliation
Environment Agency Austria, Austria
Rabitsch, Wolfgang;
Affiliation
International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Switzerland
Roy, Sugoto;
GND
1053926162
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for national and international plant health, Germany
Starfinger, Uwe;
Affiliation
APEM Ltd, United Kingdom
Stebbing, Paul D.;
Affiliation
Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Wildlife Management and Invasive Species, Belgium
Stuyck, Jan;
Affiliation
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), United Kingdom
Sutton-Croft, Mike;
Affiliation
University of Florence, Italy
Tricarico, Elena;
Affiliation
Belgian Biodiversity Platform, Belgium
Vanderhoeven, Sonia;
Affiliation
Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Wildlife Management and Invasive Species, Belgium
Verreycken, Hugo;
Affiliation
Newcastle University, Modelling, Evidence and Policy Group, United Kingdom
Mill, Aileen C.

Prioritizing the management of invasive alien species (IAS) is of global importance and within Europe integral to the EU IAS regulation. To prioritize management effectively, the risks posed by IAS need to be assessed, but so too does the feasibility of their management. While the risk of IAS to the EU has been assessed, the feasibility of management has not. We assessed the feasibility of eradicating 60 new (not yet established) and 35 emerging (established with limited distribution) species that pose a threat to the EU, as identified by horizon scanning. The assessment was carried out by 34 experts in invasion management from across Europe, applying the Non-Native Risk Management scheme to defined invasion scenarios and eradication strategies for each species, assessing the feasibility of eradication using seven key risk management criteria. Management priorities were identified by combining scores for risk (derived from horizon scanning) and feasibility of eradication. The results show eradication feasibility score and risk score were not correlated, indicating that risk management criteria evaluate different information than risk assessment. In all, 17 new species were identified as particularly high priorities for eradication should they establish in the future, whereas 14 emerging species were identified as priorities for eradication now. A number of species considered highest priority for eradication were terrestrial vertebrates, a group that has been the focus of a number of eradication attempts in Europe. However, eradication priorities also included a diverse range of other taxa (plants, invertebrates and fish) suggesting there is scope to broaden the taxonomic range of attempted eradication in Europe. We demonstrate that broad scale structured assessments of management feasibility can help prioritize IAS for management. Such frameworks are needed to support evidence-based decision-making.

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License Holder: 2020 The Authors.

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