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Pest survey card on Xylosandrus crassiusculu

GND
1139391372
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for national and international plant health, Germany
Hoppe, Björn;
GND
1139392492
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for national and international plant health, Germany
Wilstermann, Anne;
GND
105893614X
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for national and international plant health, Germany
Schrader, Gritta;
Affiliation
ohne Angabe
Delbianco, Alice;
Affiliation
ohne Angabe
Vos, Sybren

This pest survey card was prepared in the context of the EFSA mandate on plant pest surveillance (M‐2017‐0137) at the request of the European Commission. Its purpose is to guide the Member States in preparing data and information for Xylosandruscrassiusculussurveys. These are required to design statistically sound and risk‐based pest surveys, in line with current international standards.Xylosandruscrassiusculusis an ambrosia beetle within the subfamily Scolytinaeand is a clearlydistinguished taxonomic entity. The pest is present on all continents.Within the EU,X.crassiusculusis currently present in Italy, France and Spain and transient in Slovenia.Although itis currently reported in Mediterranean areas, the pest appears able to become established in many countries and regions of the Union territory. The ambrosia beetle is highly polyphagous and able to attack several broadleaf trees species. However, in Europe only three tree species have been reported as infested:Ceratonia siliqua, Cercissiliquastrum and Castaneasativa.The beetle may attack both thin branches of living trees (or saplings) and freshly cut wood.Trade of plants for planting, timber and wood products, as well as woodpacking material are major pathways for the introduction of X. crassiusculus into the EU and this is also confirmed by multiple interceptions at points of entry. Hence, international airports and seaports and surrounding areas with trading activities are considered risk locations and risk areas. In addition, as a lot of information on attacks on saplings in nurseries is available from North America, large nurseries with international trade may also be considered risk locations. Trapping is recommended when the females emerge and start attacking new hosts. Their flight activity is linked to warm daily temperatures and can start in early spring and last until October.

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License Holder: European Food Safety Authority, 2020

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