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Route of a Multipartite Nanovirus across the Body of Its Aphid Vector

Affiliation
UMR BGPI, INRAE, CIRAD, Montpellier SupAgro, Univ. Montpellier, Montpellier, France
Di Mattia, Jérémy;
Affiliation
UMR BGPI, INRAE, CIRAD, Montpellier SupAgro, Univ. Montpellier, Montpellier, France
Vernerey, Marie-Stéphanie;
Affiliation
UMR BGPI, INRAE, CIRAD, Montpellier SupAgro, Univ. Montpellier, Montpellier, France
Yvon, Michel;
Affiliation
UMR BGPI, INRAE, CIRAD, Montpellier SupAgro, Univ. Montpellier, Montpellier, France
Pirolles, Elodie;
Affiliation
UMR BGPI, INRAE, CIRAD, Montpellier SupAgro, Univ. Montpellier, Montpellier, France
Villegas, Mathilde;
GND
1139863169
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Epidemiology and Pathogen Diagnostics, Germany
Gaafar, Yahya;
GND
1058967991
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Epidemiology and Pathogen Diagnostics, Germany
Ziebell, Heiko;
Affiliation
MIVEGEC, CNRS, IRD, Univ Montpellier, Montpellier, France
Michalakis, Yannis;
Affiliation
UMR BGPI, INRAE, CIRAD, Montpellier SupAgro, Univ. Montpellier, Montpellier, France ; UMR IPME, IRD, CIRAD, Univ. Montpellier, Montpellier, France
Zeddam, Jean-Louis;
Affiliation
UMR BGPI, INRAE, CIRAD, Montpellier SupAgro, Univ. Montpellier, Montpellier, France
Blanc, Stéphane

Vector transmission plays a primary role in the life cycle of viruses, and insects are the most common vectors. An important mode of vector transmission, reported only for plant viruses, is circulative nonpropagative transmission whereby the virus cycles within the body of its insect vector, from gut to salivary glands and saliva, without replicating. This mode of transmission has been extensively studied in the viral families Luteoviridae and Geminiviridae and is also reported for Nanoviridae. The biology of viruses within these three families is different, and whether the viruses have evolved similar molecular/cellular virus-vector interactions is unclear. In particular, nanoviruses have a multipartite genome organization, and how the distinct genome segments encapsidated individually transit through the insect body is unknown. Here, using a combination of fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, we monitor distinct proteins and genome segments of the nanovirus Faba bean necrotic stunt virus (FBNSV) during transcytosis through the gut and salivary gland cells of its aphid vector Acyrthosiphon pisum. FBNSV specifically transits through cells of the anterior midgut and principal salivary gland cells, a route similar to that of geminiviruses but distinct from that of luteoviruses. Our results further demonstrate that a large number of virus particles enter every single susceptible cell so that distinct genome segments always remain together. Finally, we confirm that the success of nanovirus-vector interaction depends on a nonstructural helper component, the viral protein nuclear shuttle protein (NSP), which is shown to be mandatory for viral accumulation within gut cells.

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License Holder: 2020 American Society for Microbiology.

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