Classical swine fever (CSF) in wild boar: the role of the transplacental infection in the perpetuation of CSF

Kaden, Volker GND; Steyer, H.; Schnabel, J.; Bruer, W.

Thirty-four pregnant wild sows and their unborn progeny derived from an endemically infected population in the district of Nordvorpommern (Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania) were investigated for classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and antibodies. During the last 2.5 years of the epidemic, 20 out of 34 pregnant wild sows investigated were serologically positive. No CSFV or viral RNA was detected in organs derived from these animals and their progeny, This indicates that young wild boars persistently infected by transplacental virus transmission do not play a crucial role in the perpetuation of CSFV in wild boar. Other factors seem to be more important for the establishment of CSF as well as for virus perpetuation in the population

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Kaden, Volker / Steyer, H. / Schnabel, J. / et al: Classical swine fever (CSF) in wild boar: the role of the transplacental infection in the perpetuation of CSF. 2005.

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