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Do Low-Growing Gap Crop Types Affect Pollen-Mediated Gene Flow in Maize?

GND
130200638
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI), Federal Research Centre of Cultivated Plants, Institute for Crop and Soil Science, Braunschweig, Germany
Langhof, Maren;
GND
1058920871
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI), Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Ecological Chemistry, Plant Analysis and Stored Product Protection, Berlin, Germany
Hommel, Bernd;
GND
129526568
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI), Federal Research Centre of Cultivated Plants, Institute for Biosafety in Plant Biotechnology, Quedlinburg , Deutschland
Hüsken, Alexandra;
GND
141232439
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI), Federal Research Centre of Cultivated Plants, Institute for Biosafety in Plant Biotechnology, Quedlinburg , Deutschland
Schiemann, Joachim;
GND
1059146940
Affiliation
Julius Kuehn Institute (JKI), Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Breeding Research on Agricultural Crops, Sanitz, Germany
Wehling, Peter;
GND
1058990772
Affiliation
Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI), Federal Research Centre of Cultivated Plants, Institute for Crop and Soil Science, Braunschweig, Germany
Rühl, Gerhard

One of the most accepted and adopted measures to assure coexistence of genetically modified (GM) maize (Zea mays L.) and conventional or organic maize is an isolation distance between GM and non-GM fields. If crop types used as “gap crops” differ in their effect on pollen- mediated gene flow this might have implications for the development of coexistence measures. Therefore, in a 3-yr study, the effect of a 25 m wide strip of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) stubble and clover-grass (Trifolium pratense L. and Lolium spp.) as a gap crop on pollen-mediatedgene flow in maize was investigated at two sites in northern Germany. It was hypothesized that different thermal conditions above the dry (barley stubble) and the wet (clover-grass) gap crop may cause differences in pollen-mediated gene flow into the adjacent recipient fields. Due to a ban on GM-maize cultivation in Germany, kernel color was used as a phenotypic marker to assess gene flow. Outcrossing was mainly concentrated to the downwind areas of the recipient fields with a pronounced edge effect. The application of a general linear mixed effect model showed that there was no significant effect of the gap crop type on the amount of pollen-mediated gene flow. It is concluded that the crop type planted between GM and non-GM maize has no major importance for the development of coexistence measures.

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