Classical swine fever virus strain "C" protects the offspring by oral immunisation of pregnant sows

Kaden, Volker GND; Lange, Elke GND; Steyer, H.; Lange, Bodo; Klopfleisch, Robert GND; Teifke, Jens Peter GND; Bruer, W.

The aim of this study was to evaluate if oral immunisation of wild sows protects the fetuses from transplacental infection. Two experiments were carried out with gilts vaccinated orally with C-strain virus approximately 5 weeks after insemination. They were challenged at mid-gestation with highly virulent classical swine fever virus (CSFV) or moderately virulent field virus. The results revealed that oral vaccination has no negative impact on the pregnancy, and all vaccinated sows developed neutralising antibodies. After infection no symptoms were detected in the six vaccinated-infected sows. Challenge virus could neither be found in blood, nasal and fecal swabs or saliva nor in organs sampled at necropsy. Likewise, all fetuses originating from vaccinated sows were virologically and serologically negative. In contrast, the controls developed a short viremia and as a result of the transplacental infection all fetuses were CSFV positive. In addition, 22 serologically positive wild sows of an endemically infected area, where oral vaccination had also been carried out, and their offspring were free from CSFV or viral RNA. Our results confirm that oral immunisation of pregnant wild sows with C-strain vaccine may protect the fetuses against CSF. (c) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

Files

Cite

Citation style:

Kaden, Volker / Lange, Elke / Steyer, H. / et al: Classical swine fever virus strain "C" protects the offspring by oral immunisation of pregnant sows. 2008.

Export